AMOC circulation
The AMOC: its role in climate and its mechanisms of variability

The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), a large-scale circulation pattern in the Atlantic, plays a central role in climate through its heat and freshwater transports. New research proposes monitoring a specific region that may enable scientists to better predict AMOC variability and future climate.

El Nino and drought
More frequent droughts and floods likely in California later this century

In the future, the Pacific Ocean's temperature cycles could disrupt more than just December fishing. Known collectively as the El Niño Southern Oscillation, or ENSO, the changing seasonal phenomena known as El Niño and La Niña could lead to at least a doubling of extreme droughts and floods in California later this century.

AMOC and Gulf Stream
AMOC impact on the physical and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf Stream region

The underlying physical driver for the decadal variability in the Gulf Stream path and the regional biogeochemical cycling is linked to the low-frequency variability of the large-scale ocean circulation in the Atlantic, also known as Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC).

2 Map models
Possible decadal growth in Atlantic winter sea ice extent in coming years

Climate model projections provide a compelling reason to believe that anthropogenic warming will lead to a pronounced reduction in Arctic sea ice extent over the course of this century and beyond, but there is no reason to expect this long-term sea ice retreat to occur steadily through time, according to new research by Yeager et al.

Four color map models
Enhanced warming of the Northwest Atlantic Ocean

In the Northwest Atlantic, the ensemble of global climate models has a warm bias in sea surface temperature due to a misrepresentation of the Gulf Stream position; thus, existing climate change projections could be underestimating the warming rate in the upper ocean by two to three times, according to new research by Saba et al.

Welcome to the US Climate Variability and Predictability Program

CLIVAR Open Science Conference

Mark your calendar for a conference that will span the scope of CLIVAR science under the main theme of "Charting the Course of Climate and Ocean Research" on September 18-25, 2016 in Qingdao, China. Abstracts for the main conference and the Early Career Scientist Symposium, poster clusters, and travel grants are due March 15. Town hall proposals should be submitted by June 15. 

Webinar series on process studies

Antarctic Circumpolar Current schematic

The PSMI Panel is organizing a set of webinars (45 minutes in length each) on process studies from November 2015 to March 2016. The goals of this webinar series are to provide feedback on the plans and challenges for individual process studies and distill programmatic lessons learned. For information on how to log in, view the calendar on the PSMI webpage and click "look for more" to see the complete list. 

CLIVAR-relevant sessions at the 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting

Ocean Sciences logo

The 2016 Ocean Sciences Meeting will be held from February 21-26, 2016 in New Orleans, Louisiana. In preparation for the meeting, the US CLIVAR Project Office has compiled a condensed list of sessions that are relevant to the community. 

2015 Variations Fall Edition: The Southern Ocean's role in climate

cover imate

Vertical exchange in the Southern Ocean between the atmosphere and the surface and deep ocean has a profound influence on the oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon and heat, as well as nutrient resupply from the abyss to the surface. Despite this importance, the Southern Ocean remains the most poorly observed and understood part of the global ocean. This collection of articles looks to understand the Southern Ocean's role in climate. 

Research Highlight: Possible decadal growth in Atlantic winter sea ice extent in coming years

Arctic sea ice

Climate model projections provide a compelling reason to believe that anthropogenic warming will lead to a pronounced reduction in Arctic sea ice extent over the course of this century and beyond, but there is no reason to expect this long-term sea ice retreat to occur steadily through time, according to new research by Yeager et al.

Research Highlight: AMOC impact on the physical and biogeochemical variability in the Gulf Stream region

AMOC impacts on ecosystems

According to a new paper by Sanchez-Franks and Zhang, the underlying physical driver for the decadal variability in the Gulf Stream path and the regional biogeochemical cycling is linked to the low-frequency variability of the large-scale ocean circulation in the Atlantic, also known as Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC).